Text

swanqueenidiot:

Okay so the Colbert Report posted a link to the Ellen Page interview, right

image

And I was already happy it was a fan favorite. But THE COMMENTS

image

I MEAN

image

IT’S JUST TOO GREAT

image

ADAM AND EVE NOT ADAM AND MAPLE LEAF

(via assassinslover)

Source: swanqueenidiot
Photo
atticuschapin:

descentintotyranny:

Judge to Sikh Man: Remove “That Rag”
Sep. 25 2013
Today, in a letter to the Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT), the ACLU and United Sikhs called on state officials to investigate the harassment of a Sikh commercial truck driver pulled over early this year for a flat tire.  After detaining Mr. Jageet Singh in January as he passed through Mississippi, the officers called him a “terrorist” and harassed and humiliated him because of his appearance and religious beliefs.  As a devout Sikh, Mr. Singh wears a turban and carries a kirpan.  A kirpan is a small, spiritual sword that is sheathed and sewn to the waistband. It is designed and worn as an article of faith, much as a cross is worn by devout Christians.
Contending, wrongly, that his kirpan was illegal, the officers demanded that Mr. Singh remove it. When Mr. Singh explained that he was a Sikh and that the kirpan was a sacred religious article, the officers laughed at him and mocked his religious beliefs. One officer declared that all Sikhs are “depraved” and “terrorists.” They continued to taunt him, and forced Mr. Singh to circle his truck with his hands on his turban while they searched the vehicle. Finally, not content with this humiliation, they arrested him, claiming that Mr. Singh had refused to obey an officer’s lawful command.
Mr. Singh’s ordeal did not end with the MDOT. When he returned to Mississippi on March 26, 2013, for his court date at the Pike County Justice Court, he once again suffered humiliation, harassment, and discrimination because of his religious beliefs. Waiting for his attorney in the back of the courtroom, he was stunned when four Highway Patrol officers approached him and ordered him to leave the courtroom. The officers stated that Judge Aubrey Rimes had ordered them to eject Mr. Singh from the courtroom because he did not like Mr. Singh’s turban. Moreover, they told Mr. Singh that Judge Rimes would punish him if he failed to remove his headdress.
When Mr. Singh’s attorney went to Judge Rimes’s chambers to inquire about the matter, he readily confirmed that he had expelled Mr. Singh from the courtroom because of his turban. He further stated that Mr. Singh would not be allowed to re-enter the courtroom unless he removed “that rag” from his head and threatened to call Mr. Singh last on the docket if he continued to wear the religious headdress.
As an observant Sikh, Mr. Singh wears a turban at all times as a reminder and public declaration of his connection to God. For him, the turban is an inseparable part of his Sikh religious identity: Like all Sikhs, Mr. Singh believes that a man cannot be considered a Sikh if he does not wear the turban and that unwrapping his turban and exposing his “naked” head in public is sacrilegious and shameful.
Mr. Singh respectfully declined to remove his turban. As threatened, Judge Rimes forced Mr. Singh and his attorney to wait for several hours until every other litigant had been heard before allowing him into the courtroom.
The Pike County Board of Supervisors recently recognized that Judge Rimes’s harassment of Mr. Singh was unacceptable. In response to an investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), the Board revised the County’s harassment and non-discrimination policy to explain that religious discrimination includes “requiring an individual to remove a head covering or denying that individual access to a County office, building, program or activity because they are wearing a head covering, if that head covering is worn for religious reasons.”
But Judge Rimes should not have needed a DOJ investigation or county policy to know that his conduct was impertinent and inappropriate. Our justice system is founded on the principle that every person entering a courthouse is equal before the law and is entitled to respect. Judge Rimes’s treatment of Mr. Singh – in particular his use of the slur “rag” and his effort to intimidate and embarrass Mr. Singh because of his minority faith – flouted his responsibility under the Mississippi Judicial Code of Conduct to uphold the dignity of the judiciary.
The ACLU and United Sikhs also plan to file a complaint with the Mississippi Judicial Commission, asking officials to investigate Judge Rimes’s conduct and impose appropriate sanctions.
The letter sent today to MDOT officials demands that they provide public documents relating to Mr. Singh’s detainment and arrest and urges them to implement an ongoing training program to educate officers about their responsibility to treat every person with dignity and to remain respectful of religious diversity.

You know why Sikh’s carry the Kirpan dagger with them always?
They do this so that they will be ready, at any time or place, to defend the innocent against oppression.
"Sikhs embody the qualities of a "Sant Sipahi" or saint-soldier. One must have control over one’s internal vices and be able to be constantly immersed in virtues clarified in the Guru Granth Sahib. A Sikh must also have the courage to defend the rights of all who are wrongfully oppressed or persecuted irrespective of their colour, caste or creed."

atticuschapin:

descentintotyranny:

Judge to Sikh Man: Remove “That Rag”

Sep. 25 2013

Today, in a letter to the Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT), the ACLU and United Sikhs called on state officials to investigate the harassment of a Sikh commercial truck driver pulled over early this year for a flat tire.  After detaining Mr. Jageet Singh in January as he passed through Mississippi, the officers called him a “terrorist” and harassed and humiliated him because of his appearance and religious beliefs.  As a devout Sikh, Mr. Singh wears a turban and carries a kirpan.  A kirpan is a small, spiritual sword that is sheathed and sewn to the waistband. It is designed and worn as an article of faith, much as a cross is worn by devout Christians.

Contending, wrongly, that his kirpan was illegal, the officers demanded that Mr. Singh remove it. When Mr. Singh explained that he was a Sikh and that the kirpan was a sacred religious article, the officers laughed at him and mocked his religious beliefs. One officer declared that all Sikhs are “depraved” and “terrorists.” They continued to taunt him, and forced Mr. Singh to circle his truck with his hands on his turban while they searched the vehicle. Finally, not content with this humiliation, they arrested him, claiming that Mr. Singh had refused to obey an officer’s lawful command.

Mr. Singh’s ordeal did not end with the MDOT. When he returned to Mississippi on March 26, 2013, for his court date at the Pike County Justice Court, he once again suffered humiliation, harassment, and discrimination because of his religious beliefs. Waiting for his attorney in the back of the courtroom, he was stunned when four Highway Patrol officers approached him and ordered him to leave the courtroom. The officers stated that Judge Aubrey Rimes had ordered them to eject Mr. Singh from the courtroom because he did not like Mr. Singh’s turban. Moreover, they told Mr. Singh that Judge Rimes would punish him if he failed to remove his headdress.

When Mr. Singh’s attorney went to Judge Rimes’s chambers to inquire about the matter, he readily confirmed that he had expelled Mr. Singh from the courtroom because of his turban. He further stated that Mr. Singh would not be allowed to re-enter the courtroom unless he removed “that rag” from his head and threatened to call Mr. Singh last on the docket if he continued to wear the religious headdress.

As an observant Sikh, Mr. Singh wears a turban at all times as a reminder and public declaration of his connection to God. For him, the turban is an inseparable part of his Sikh religious identity: Like all Sikhs, Mr. Singh believes that a man cannot be considered a Sikh if he does not wear the turban and that unwrapping his turban and exposing his “naked” head in public is sacrilegious and shameful.

Mr. Singh respectfully declined to remove his turban. As threatened, Judge Rimes forced Mr. Singh and his attorney to wait for several hours until every other litigant had been heard before allowing him into the courtroom.

The Pike County Board of Supervisors recently recognized that Judge Rimes’s harassment of Mr. Singh was unacceptable. In response to an investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), the Board revised the County’s harassment and non-discrimination policy to explain that religious discrimination includes “requiring an individual to remove a head covering or denying that individual access to a County office, building, program or activity because they are wearing a head covering, if that head covering is worn for religious reasons.”

But Judge Rimes should not have needed a DOJ investigation or county policy to know that his conduct was impertinent and inappropriate. Our justice system is founded on the principle that every person entering a courthouse is equal before the law and is entitled to respect. Judge Rimes’s treatment of Mr. Singh – in particular his use of the slur “rag” and his effort to intimidate and embarrass Mr. Singh because of his minority faith – flouted his responsibility under the Mississippi Judicial Code of Conduct to uphold the dignity of the judiciary.

The ACLU and United Sikhs also plan to file a complaint with the Mississippi Judicial Commission, asking officials to investigate Judge Rimes’s conduct and impose appropriate sanctions.

The letter sent today to MDOT officials demands that they provide public documents relating to Mr. Singh’s detainment and arrest and urges them to implement an ongoing training program to educate officers about their responsibility to treat every person with dignity and to remain respectful of religious diversity.

You know why Sikh’s carry the Kirpan dagger with them always?

They do this so that they will be ready, at any time or place, to defend the innocent against oppression.

"Sikhs embody the qualities of a "Sant Sipahi" or saint-soldier. One must have control over one’s internal vices and be able to be constantly immersed in virtues clarified in the Guru Granth Sahib. A Sikh must also have the courage to defend the rights of all who are wrongfully oppressed or persecuted irrespective of their colour, caste or creed."

(via ohmightysmiter)

Source: descentintotyranny
Photo Set
Photo Set

fictionalcharactersarebetter:

Because hiatus - part 1

It’s late and I’m sleepy. And I’ll forever wait for a scene with the mechanica bull.

(via fuck-yeah-zoie-palmer)

Source: fictionalcharactersarebetter
Video
Photo Set

cat asking for a pet

(via ohmightysmiter)

Source: oddhour
Photo

thetolkiengeek:

spoopying:

"man this essay is taking forever"

That made me laugh harder than it should

(via iluvmus1c)

Source: nan-fucket
Photo Set
Photo

caressespieces:

Someone had hilariously pointed out how Duncan and the clones kind of sounded like the premise of Powerpuff Girls, so I created this image in tribute.

(via assassinslover)

Source: caressespieces
Photo Set

"Can you please tell the people where they can find you on social media?" [x]

(via lazarusgirl)

Source: ritaa-volks
Photo

nudityandnerdery:

comicsalliance:

SAN DIEGO COMIC-CON DOESN’T WANT TO ADDRESS ITS HARASSMENT PROBLEM BECAUSE PEOPLE MIGHT THINK IT HAS A HARASSMENT PROBLEM

By Chris Sims

San Diego’s Comic-Con International has a problem that it doesn’t want to address. See, a few weeks back, a group called GeeksForCONsent launched a petition urging Comic-Con to adopt a formal harassment policy in place of the broad, basically unenforceable “code of conduct” that’s currently in place. Like many conventions, SDCC has a huge problem with women — particularly women cosplayers — being harassed by other con-goers and dubious media “professionals”, and the present policy offers victims little recourse.

Comic-Con’s existing policy, which can be found in its 200-page programming guide and on the event’s website, is as follows:

Attendees must respect common sense rules for public behavior, personal interaction, common courtesy, and respect for private property. Harassing or offensive behavior will not be tolerated. Comic-Con reserves the right to revoke, without refund, the membership and badge of any attendee not in compliance with this policy. Persons finding themselves in a situation where they feel their safety is at risk or who become aware of an attendee not in compliance with this policy should immediately locate a member of security, or a staff member, so that the matter can be handled in an expeditious manner.

GeeksForCONsent’s petition asks that Comic-Con amend the policy thusly:

  • A harassment reporting mechanism and visible, easy to find on-site support for people who report harassment.
  • Signs throughout the convention publicizing the harassment policy and zero-tolerance enforcement mechanisms.
  • Information for attendees on how to report harassment.
  • A one-hour training for volunteers on how to respond to harassment reports.

As a response to the petition, David Glanzer, Comic-Con’s director of marketing and public relations — someone whose actual job is to talk to the media about this sort of thing — gave a remarkable interview to CBR‘s Albert Ching where he suggested, astonishingly, that instituting a more explicit anti-harassment policy would be a problem in and of itself, because people in the media and the attendee base might think that Comic-Con has a problem with harassment.

…because we’re really an international show, and have 3,000 members of the media, I think the story would be harassment is such an issue at Comic-Con that they needed to post these signs around there. Now, people within the industry, and fans, know that isn’t the case, but the general public out there, and I think the news media, might look at this as, “Why would you, if this wasn’t such a bad issue, why do you feel the need to single out this one issue and put signs up about it?” I think that’s a concern.

That’s not really how rules work.

READ MORE

"Look, if we try to do something about the problem, that would just let people know there is a problem. And that’d just be bad, right? I mean, for our PR. As opposed to being good for awareness. But the PR!"

(via heartsways)

Source: comicsalliance
Video

Just uploaded ROCKtheMEDIA Exclusive MIXTAPE VOL. III to Mixcloud. Listen now!

Photo
Photo Set

orphanblack:

A spot of tea with the wonderful Evelyne Brochu! (x)

(via assassinslover)

Source: orphanblack
Photo Set